M

blog

June 16, 2021

Eye Test: What to Expect

Before any tests are conducted, you will have an in-depth talk with an optometrist followed by a physical examination. The optometrist will ask you to describe your symptoms and may want to know about the type of eye problem you are experiencing. Knowing about previous illnesses and diseases that run in your family can help the optometrist, as does information about work-related strains and your individual lifestyle. As part of the physical examination, the doctor checks for things like any abnormality in the eye and whether you need prescription vision correction. By familiarizing yourself with what you can expect at your appointment, you can go into your eye test free of any kind of hesitation or anxiety.

Types of Routine Eye Tests for Adults

Below are the different types of eye tests and what you can expect in a comprehensive examination.

Pre-Exam Tests

During the pretesting stage of your eye exam, an ophthalmic technician will perform a few basic tests, including a peripheral vision test, a glaucoma (to measure the pressure in your eye) and a cover test (to assess the alignment of eyes) using different pre-test equipment to determine the condition of your eyes.

Pupillary Response Test

This test is done to check the responsiveness of the pupils of your eyes. Your pupils’ response to light and your eye’s ability to see things that are both close up and far away are natural functions of the eye and are critical to your vision. While shining a light in your eyes, the optometrist will also look at the surface of your eye for signs of dry eye, corneal scratches and any abnormalities in shape of your pupils.

Slit Lamp Test

This is the most common diagnostic test for eyes and involves examining the eye surface under a specially designed microscope – a slit lamp biomicroscope, which will detect any abnormalities on the surface as well as interior of the eye. The test is conducted in a semi-dark room with the biomicroscope projecting a narrow beam of light into your eye, allowing for detailed examination of your eyelids and lashes, tear film, conjunctiva, cornea, iris and pupil and lens.

Visual Acuity and Refraction

This is one of the most common form of a comprehensive eye test for determining the sharpness of your vision. Your optometrist will will ask you to read a projected eye chart filled with numbers and letters, of different sizes arranged in rows and columns, with one or both eyes. Your ability to clearly read and identify the numbers and letters helps them further determine your vision prescription needs. To find your exact lens prescription, your optometrist will ask you to put on a trial spectacle frame with different lenses and place a large lens refractor in front of you, and ask you to check which lens make your vision clearest or offer you the best vision. 

Pupil Dilation

Your optometrist can examine your retina and optic nerve clearly by performing a pupil dilation test. This test is conducted by placing a few drops of pupil dilating eye drops in your eyes to enlarge the pupils, causing more light to enter your eye for a better visual examination. Because you may experience blurry vision, light sensitivity, and dilation of pupils for several minutes, we recommend that you avoid being outside in direct sunlight afterward and have someone drive you to the optometrist.

Take Your Free M Test

The recommended schedule for routine eye tests varies as per your age, but a complete eye examination every two to four years is recommended for most adults. It’s best to get in touch with your optometrist to learn more about how often you should get your eyes tested. Take a walk-in appointment for an eye test with an optometrist at a MAGRABi store near you contact us ahead of time to schedule an appointment. Our optometrist will make recommendations with regards to reviewing the strength of your lenses and help you find the right lenses for your eyes.

More blog posts

  • July_02_Blog-direct-image-342-210.jpg

    5 Eye Problems You Should Never Ignore

    Read more
  • July_01_Blog-direct-image-342-210.jpg

    Six Common Contact Lens Myths Busted

    Read more
  • Blog-direct-image-342_210-01.jpg

    A Beginner's Guide to Colored Contact Lenses

    Read more